Racial/ethnic mismatch and behavior

Racial/ethnic mismatch and behavior

When school psychologists assess a child’s behavior, we rely heavily on tools that ask important people in that child’s life (teachers, parents) about how that child behaves. We know that different raters generally give different answers when talking about student behavior, and one thing that may influence those answers is whether the teacher and student are of the same or different race/ethnicity. Some research suggests that teachers who are of a different race/ethnicity than their student may be more likely to rate that student as inattentive or disruptive. This project’s objective is to evaluate whether students who experience a racial/ethnic mismatch with their teachers are more likely to be perceived as disruptive, unengaged, and unsuccessful by their teachers than students who do not experience a racial/ethnic mismatch with a large, national data set and some advanced statistical methods which will hopefully build upon prior work. Personnel on this project include Barbara Katic, Tyler Womack, and Ruiwen Zheng.

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Austin H. Johnson
Assistant Professor

I’m an Assistant Professor of School Psychology at the University of California, Riverside.